FOLLOW US
877-TEMP-LBR

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Two Weeks’ Notice

The fact of the matter is that turnover is a very real thing, especially when it comes to construction or hospitality staffing. Employees find new jobs, be it because they are unhappy, are moving or simply want to work in a new position. Ideally an exiting employee provides you with notice. Two weeks is standard but let’s be honest, even a week is nice.

The Employer’s Role

When you receive a two weeks’ notice, you have options. Unless a contract stipulates it, you are not required to grant the employee the entire two weeks if you already have a new person trained and lined up. On the other hand, you can ask the employee to stay a little longer than two weeks, but he is not obligated to say yes. Replacing an employee can be time-intensive, so begin searching for a replacement as soon as possible. You can look for new hires at a job fair or through a staffing agency. Bringing in a temp could give you some extra time to find the perfect long-term person for the position.

Managing the Last Two Weeks

If the employee is in good standing, there is usually not a reason to let him go immediately once he has given notice. After all, he did provide you the courtesy of notice. You may want to set up some expectations for the last two weeks. One theory says that you just politely let departing employees know that nothing will change–they will be responsible for the same duties they have always been and that now there is simply a defined end date.

If you are not comfortable with this, you may choose to downgrade their duties a bit. You may transition them away from some of the job functions that are key to the overall business and ask that they work in a backup role while they finish out their time with your company. If you exercise this option, take some time to explain to the employee that you appreciate their being straightforward with you but that you have a process for transitioning staff out of your company. Keep in mind that allowing staff to complete their notice sends a good signal to other staff members. It will make them more likely to warn you when they decide upon a job change themselves and let them know that you are an understanding employer.

Dealing with the fact that employees quit is simply part of running a business. Every manager needs to be ready to transition employees out of their jobs while simultaneously bringing on new staff. Having a plan in place will help to make this process easier for you.

Sources:

How to Hire Wisely (Inc.)

Related Posts:

A Well Oiled Machine

Tags: , , ,

How to Keep Staff Motivated

Business operators quickly discover that when employees grow bored with tasks or apathetic about their responsibilities, their work will begin to suffer and their creative attempts become mediocre at best. An unmotivated staff can hinder the entire company. It usually falls on the supervisors and managers to find nonmonetary methods of inspiring passion and hard work from each staff member. There are many simple ways to boost morale and inspire employees to offer their best efforts.

Give Recognition

Disgruntled staff members often complain that their best work goes unnoticed. Make a point to acknowledge and occasionally celebrate a job well done. It will boost the employee’s self-confidence, and encourage him to perform at higher levels in the future. Recognition can be public, private, casual, or formal. Different situations will warrant a different response. Public acknowledgement for hard work will not only encourage the recognized employee, it will also encourage the rest of the staff to strive for the same honor.

Talk Long Term

An employee lacking direction will struggle with finding motivation for their daily tasks. To give your workers a sense of purpose and forward motion, try talking to them with the future in mind. Transform their jobs into careers by asking about their long-term goals and leaving the door open for future promotions and job titles.

Improve the Working Environment

Working in a clean, uncluttered, and decorated environment can do wonders for staff morale.

Collectively improve the mood your employees by adding warm paint hues, a few paintings, and maybe some plants. These changes may seem trivial, but surveys indicate that employees highly credit an aesthetically pleasing office environment with productivity and motivation.

Work on Your Attitude

Bad moods can be contagious. If you display fatigue, frustration, or apathy, your employees will start to show the same attitude. Train yourself to smile and voice your own passion for the work you do. Other staff members might also get swept up in your excitement.

Keeping your staff focused and motivated is a huge part of your job as a manager. The communications that you convey can keep everyone on track and ready to work as a team. Here at Labor Systems, we have a few principles that we take to heart and incorporate into our management philosophy which we have been very happy with. They have bred success with our staff here in Arizona and in the other states where we provide temporary employment services.

Sources:

20 Ways to Motivate Your Employees Without Raising Their Pay (Biztrain)

7 Tips for Motivating Employees (Inc. Magazine)

Related Posts:

Taking Care of People Pays Off

Tags: , ,

How Management Change Affects Staff

Entering a new company as a manager can be an intimidating experience. You’re worried about what your new team will think of you, if they will respect you, and if you’ll be able to shape them into a productive, smooth-running operation. New management can sometimes leave staff members feeling stressed, confused, or bitter. Learn how to nip any chaos or problems in the bud starting on your first day.

Getting to Know Your Company

It’s hard to follow a leader who feels lost in his surroundings. Don’t let your staff feel directionless. Learn about your new company. Educate yourself on how things have always been done. This doesn’t mean you can’t make changes, but it is easier to point employees in a new direction if you know where they are coming from.

Getting to Know Your Staff

A distant manager can intimidate employees or cause misunderstandings. Take time to familiarize yourself with your new team. It will not only improve morale around the office, it will make your delegations much easier. An effective manager knows the strengths and weaknesses of each employee under him. Take note of who gives amazing customer service, who always offers creative problem solving, and who composes the most convincing copy.

Some new managers can take this too far. Don’t try so hard to befriend employees that they lose their respect for you as a boss. Staff should feel comfortable coming to you with their problems or concerns, while still remembering that you give the final word.

Making Changes

Many employees, especially ones who have worked in the same company for years, are going to feel resistant if you start making several changes at once. In most cases, a gradual pace for change is best. Your staff will slowly adjust to the differences in their daily routine, and you can accurately observe what is working and what methods need to be reevaluated.

As you are settling into your new position you will have to get into the swing of things relatively quickly. Your ability to make the right decision will probably be tested your first week, if not your first day. If you are looking for ways to save money and time and show upper management that you can make a real impact, then you should consider reducing labor costs by utilizing temporary labor for some your open positions.

Sources:

The Worst New Manager Mistakes (BNET)

Top 10 New Manager Mistakes (About.com)

Related Posts:

Child Labor in Arizona

What Makes a Good Hospitality Employee

Tags: , , , ,