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How to Describe Management Experience on a Resume

Every job seeker has the same goal while polishing his resume: to keep his list of experience and accomplishments from hitting the trash can. As hiring managers skim through work histories, they are often looking for signs of leadership and past management positions. Optimize your management experience by choosing the ideal placement, giving the right amount of information, and perfecting the wording to catch the manager’s interest.

Find Proper Placement

To most effectively draw attention to your management experience, place it at the top of your resume, directly under the career objective. If your past management position was not your most recent employment, you can still move it to the top of the resume in several ways. Many people will only include relevant work experience on the resume. Others choose not to list their work history chronologically, but instead in order of relevance. Whichever option you choose, be careful to be upfront in its labeling. You do not want the hiring manager to suspect you are trying to trick him.

Know What Information to Give

Don’t clutter up your resume with information the hiring manager won’t need. Common examples of this are the full addresses of businesses or the names of your supervisors. Instead, focus on your achievements. Provide a description of your management position, and most importantly, don’t spare any details about ways you helped bring in extra profits or increase productivity. This is your place to brag about what you can do and convince a potential future boss that you would be an asset to their company. Other information to provide about past management experience includes:

  • Exact job title
  • Company name
  • Company description
  • Length of employment

Craft the Perfect Wording

Before diving into your work descriptions, strategize. You want short, direct sentences that communicate a strong message and set you apart from other applicants. Try to start sentences with action verbs when possible. Use specific language, leaving aside fluffy word choices such as “great,” “good,” or “things.” Of course, your final step should include several thorough proofreads. You don’t distract the hiring manager from your leadership skills with an accidental misspelling. Guard against errors with the help of a friend for a final and honest look over before sending your resume to a potential new employer.

For more tips on employment—both getting hired and hiring—please visit us online. We offer a wide variety of staffing solutions for many different industries.

Sources:

MIT Career Development Center

Sandbox Advisors

Tech Republic

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